Dr. Steven Schendel, MD, FRSC (C), Ophthalmologist discusses glaucoma and how it is treated.
Dr. Baseer Khan, MD, FRCS(C), P.CEO, Ophthalmologist, discusses how glaucoma is diagnosed and the 3 different treatment options available to patients.
Dr. Baseer Khan, MD, FRCS(C), P.CEO, Ophthalmologist, discusses the importance of eye drops in glaucoma.

What is Local Ophthalmologist

An ophthalmologist is a physician who specializes in Eye Care and Vision Testing the medical and surgical care of the eyes and visual system. Ophthalmologists work with patients in the prevention of eye disease and injury. In treating patients an ophthalmologist may also educate them on eye care, glasses and contact lenses, glaucoma, oculoplastics, refractive surgery, pediatric ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology, laser eye surgery, canaloplasty, cataract surgery, corneal transplant surgery and vitreo-retinal surgery. 

Glaucoma treatment is centered around lowering your IOP in order to prevent further vision loss. Drops are the first line of treatment of glaucoma. What’s really important to remember is that drops are not going to make you see better - they might even make your eye a little red or irritated. Your eye doctor will determine which of the three anti-VEGF drugs are the best treatment for your condition: bevacizumab, ranibizumab or aflibercept

Glaucoma is an eye disease caused by a buildup of intraocular pressure (IOP). Your eyes have clear liquid that flows in and out, but if you have glaucoma, this liquid doesn’t drain properly, causing this buildup of IOP pressure. Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve, which is made up of nerve fibers and transmits images from the eye to your brain.

If you have a condition known as ocular hypertension, which is a result of high ocular pressure, your risk of developing glaucoma increases.Your optometrist or ophthalmologist may want to lower your IOP as a preventative measure. However, you don’t need to have high IOP to experience glaucoma. Normal-tension glaucoma causes damage to the optic nerve, even though the person’s IOP is normal. In this case, your eye health professional may recommend lowering your IOP to slow the progression of the disease.

Intravitreal eye injections of anti-VEGF medications may be used to treat diabetic macular edema, diabetic retinopathy, branch or central vein occlusion and age-related macular degeneration. The inside of your eye is filled with vitreous, a jelly-like fluid. Your ophthalmologist will inject medicine into the vitreous found at the back of the eye near the retina to protect and hopefully improve your vision. Your eye doctor will determine which of the three anti-VEGF drugs are the best treatment for your condition: bevacizumab, ranibizumab or aflibercept. You’ll receive your intravitreal eye injections at the ophthalmologist’s office, and the procedure will take between 15 and 30 minutes. The doctor will dilate your pupils, use topical anesthesia and place a speculum in your eye to administer the intravitreal eye injection.

Patients are often concerned that intravitreal eye injections will be painful or scary. You may feel pressure during the procedure, but not pain. After the first or second procedure, patients generally feel more at ease and are motivated by the fact that they often see improvement of their visual acuity very soon. Following an intravitreal injection, you may feel pressure or grittiness in the eye, slight bleeding on the white of the eye and floaters in your vision. These are temporary and normal. There are patients who will only need a few years of intravitreal injections, but some patients need lifelong treatment.

Dr. David Ehmann

Dr. David Ehmann

Ophthalmologist
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
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Dr. Eli Moses

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Dr. Shyam Patel

MD Cataract, Cornea, & Refractive Surgeon
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Dr. Adam Chubak

Dr. Adam Chubak

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Dr. Theodore Perl

Dr. Theodore Perl

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Dr. Yuna Rapoport

Dr. Yuna Rapoport

MD, MPH Corneal, Cataract & Refractive Surgeon
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Dr. Lawrence Yannuzzi

Dr. Lawrence Yannuzzi

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Dr. J.P. Dailey

Dr. J.P. Dailey

Ophthalmologist
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Dr. Robert Baldwin

Dr. Robert Baldwin

Ophthalmologist
Erie, PA
Dr. Dr. Douglas Babel

Dr. Dr. Douglas Babel

MD
Ophthalmologist
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Dr. David Almeida

Dr. David Almeida

MD, PhD
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Dr. Adnan Pirbhai

Dr. Adnan Pirbhai

Ophthalmologist
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Dr. Patricia Teal

Dr. Patricia Teal

Ophthalmologist
Fort Erie, ON
Dr. Mario Ventresca

Dr. Mario Ventresca

Ophthalmologist
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Dr. Jamie Vahdat

Dr. Jamie Vahdat

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Dr. Andrew Taylor

Dr. Andrew Taylor

Ophthalmologist
Niagara Falls, ON
Dr. Richard E. Selser

Dr. Richard E. Selser

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Dr. Amber Sheikh

Dr. Amber Sheikh

Ophthalmologist
Niagara Falls, ON
Dr. Anthony Cabrera

Dr. Anthony Cabrera

Ophthalmologist
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Dr. El-Karim Rhemtulla

Dr. El-Karim Rhemtulla

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