Ophtalmologiste, explique ce qu'est le glaucome et comment il affecte la vision d'une personne.

 Ophthalmologist, talks about the different treatment options for glaucoma. 

Registered Dietician and Ophthalmologist, discuss the health benefits of tree nuts and pistachios.

Registered Dietician and Ophthalmologist, discuss the health benefits of tree salmon, sardines and other fatty fish.

What is Local Ophthalmologist

An ophthalmologist is a physician who specializes in Eye Care and Vision Testing the medical and surgical care of the eyes and visual system. Ophthalmologists work with patients in the prevention of eye disease and injury. In treating patients an ophthalmologist may also educate them on eye care, glasses and contact lenses, glaucoma, oculoplastics, refractive surgery, pediatric ophthalmology, neuro-ophthalmology, laser eye surgery, canaloplasty, cataract surgery, corneal transplant surgery and vitreo-retinal surgery. 

Glaucoma treatment is centered around lowering your IOP in order to prevent further vision loss. Drops are the first line of treatment of glaucoma. What’s really important to remember is that drops are not going to make you see better - they might even make your eye a little red or irritated. Your eye doctor will determine which of the three anti-VEGF drugs are the best treatment for your condition: bevacizumab, ranibizumab or aflibercept

Glaucoma is an eye disease caused by a buildup of intraocular pressure (IOP). Your eyes have clear liquid that flows in and out, but if you have glaucoma, this liquid doesn’t drain properly, causing this buildup of IOP pressure. Glaucoma is a disease of the optic nerve, which is made up of nerve fibers and transmits images from the eye to your brain.

If you have a condition known as ocular hypertension, which is a result of high ocular pressure, your risk of developing glaucoma increases.Your optometrist or ophthalmologist may want to lower your IOP as a preventative measure. However, you don’t need to have high IOP to experience glaucoma. Normal-tension glaucoma causes damage to the optic nerve, even though the person’s IOP is normal. In this case, your eye health professional may recommend lowering your IOP to slow the progression of the disease.

Intravitreal eye injections of anti-VEGF medications may be used to treat diabetic macular edema, diabetic retinopathy, branch or central vein occlusion and age-related macular degeneration. The inside of your eye is filled with vitreous, a jelly-like fluid. Your ophthalmologist will inject medicine into the vitreous found at the back of the eye near the retina to protect and hopefully improve your vision. Your eye doctor will determine which of the three anti-VEGF drugs are the best treatment for your condition: bevacizumab, ranibizumab or aflibercept. You’ll receive your intravitreal eye injections at the ophthalmologist’s office, and the procedure will take between 15 and 30 minutes. The doctor will dilate your pupils, use topical anesthesia and place a speculum in your eye to administer the intravitreal eye injection.

The Canadian Society of Oculoplastic Surgery (CSOPS) represents a qualified group of Ophthalmic Surgeons who have additional training and experience in the highly specialized fields of Eyelids, Orbit, Nasolacrimal System and Facial Aesthetics.

Pediatric ophthalmologists are medical and surgical doctors (Eye M.D.s) who specialize in the eye problems of children American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology & Strabismus

The purpose of the Canadian Ophthalmological Society is to assure the provision of optimal eye care to all Canadians by promoting excellence in ophthalmology and providing services to support its members in practice.

Patients are often concerned that intravitreal eye injections will be painful or scary. You may feel pressure during the procedure, but not pain. After the first or second procedure, patients generally feel more at ease and are motivated by the fact that they often see improvement of their visual acuity very soon. Following an intravitreal injection, you may feel pressure or grittiness in the eye, slight bleeding on the white of the eye and floaters in your vision. These are temporary and normal. There are patients who will only need a few years of intravitreal injections, but some patients need lifelong treatment.

As we age, some of the proteins that make up the lens of the eye may clump together and cloud a small area of the lens causing blurred or tinted vision. This is a cataract! Most cataracts are related to aging, but certain diseases or behaviors may also increase your risk of developing the condition. Diabetes, smoking, alcohol use or extended sun exposure can all increase one’s risk of developing a cataract. If you are experiencing cataract symptoms, consult an ophthalmologist to see if treatment is necessary. Cataract surgery is one of the most common procedures in Canada today. During cataract surgery, an ophthalmologist removes the clouded lens of the eye and replaces it with a clear artificial lens. The procedure usually takes less than an hour and is performed on an outpatient basis. If cataracts are present in both eyes, they are typically treated four to eight weeks apart.

Glaucoma is a condition characterized by elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) that can lead to damage to the optic nerve, which is responsible for transmitting visual information from the eye to the brain. The most common form of glaucoma is called primary open-angle glaucoma, where the drainage of fluid from the eye is partially blocked, resulting in increased IOP.

However, there is a subset of glaucoma patients who experience optic nerve damage and visual loss despite having normal or near-normal IOP levels. This condition is known as normal-tension glaucoma (NTG) or low-tension glaucoma. The exact cause of NTG is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve multiple factors including vascular insufficiency, genetic predisposition, and mechanical stress on the optic nerve.

Trust your eyes and face to a surgeon who specializes in oculofacial plastic surgery. All ASOPRS members are board-certified ophthalmologists who have completed advanced training in eyelid, orbit, tear duct system and facial cosmetic and reconstructive surgery

In normal individuals, the optic nerve can tolerate a certain range of IOP without being damaged. However, in some NTG patients, it is hypothesized that their optic nerves are more susceptible to damage even at normal IOP levels, possibly due to decreased blood flow to the optic nerve or increased vulnerability of the nerve fibers. Other risk factors for NTG may include a family history of glaucoma, certain systemic conditions, and abnormalities in the structure of the optic nerve.

Diagnosis and management of NTG are similar to other forms of glaucoma, with regular monitoring of the optic nerve, visual field testing, and IOP measurements. Treatment typically involves lowering IOP to slow down the progression of the disease, even if the IOP is within the normal range. This can be achieved through various methods, including medication (eye drops), laser therapy, or surgery.

It's important to note that glaucoma is a complex and multifactorial condition, and the exact causes and mechanisms may vary among individuals. Therefore, it is always recommended to consult with an eye care professional for a proper diagnosis and personalized treatment plan.

Useful Resources

Canada

Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada

British Columbia

Alberta    

Saskatchewan    

Manitoba

Ontario

Quebec

Newfoundland and Labrador

New Brunswick

Nova Scotia

Prince Edward Island

Yukon    

Northwest Territories

Nunavut

 

United States of America

National Provider Identifier (NPI) 

 

Australia

Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency

 

New Zealand

Medical Council of New Zealand

 

United Kingdom

General Medical Council

 

Ireland

Medical Council

 

South Africa

Health Professions Council Of South Africa

 

India

National Medical Commission

 

 

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